02/21/15 – Saturday Interest-ing Reads

  • Cushioning is the hot new thing in running shoes. (nytimes)
  • Why hotter weather is bad for the economy. (vox)
  • The real story behind the cross country themed movie McFarland USA. (fittish.deadspin)
  • What hospitals are doing to make surgery safer. (wsj)
  • Restaurants are once again putting bacon on everything. (washingtonpost)
  • Why meditation is so popular at present. (latimes)
  • The Riddle of Tampa Bay: Harold and Jay Bowen — who alone have managed billions for Tampa’s police and firefighters for forty years — may be two of the greatest stock pickers of all time.&nbsp (ai-cio)
  • Who should (and will) the major Oscar categories. (wsj)
  • Why mixed drink tends in the US were so awful for 30 years. (talkingpointsmemo)
  • Eventually the drought in California is going to matter. (calculatedriskblog)
  • On the slow death of the Boeing ($BA) 747. (qz)
  •  Why Samsung Design Stinks (fastcodesign)
  • The Mysterious, Murky Story Behind Soy-Sauce Packets: How Chinese takeout, a Jewish businessman from the Bronx, and NASA-approved packaging have shaped the 50-year reign of a well-loved American condiment&nbsp (theatlantic)
  • Why young African Americans are increasingly rare in baseball today. (theplayerstribune)
  •  Oliver Sacks on Learning He Has Terminal Cancer (nytimes)
  • On the strange evolution of pole vaulting. (theguardian)
  • How many calories do people consume at Chipotle ($CMG)? (nytimes)
  • Why are so many cases of Hepatitis C untreated? (mosaicscience)
  • On the relationship between impulsiveness and creativity. (fastcodesign)
  • Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence? (technologyreview)
  • A Q&A with Norman Doidge, MD author of “The Brain’s Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity.”* (bloomberg)
  • Are creative firms better off being in big cities? (theatlantic)
  • Seven ways to boost memory. (fastcompany)
  • One way or another we are going to be eating insects. (ft)
  • The brain is primed to make false conclusions. (fivethirtyeight)
  • Cable channels are speeding up shows to squeeze in more commercials. (wsj)
  • Sleep habits run in the family. (wsj)
  • Software is changing what it means to be an auto maker. (ft)
  • On finding your passion. (avc)
  • Crossfit adherents are having a hard time finding clothes that fit. (wsj)
  • More quantitative Oscar predictions. (fivethirtyeight)
  • What previous awards say about the Oscar races. (bostonglobe)
  • On the benefits of interval training even at slower speeds. (well.blogs.nytimes)
  • The Austerity Con (lrb.co.uk)
  • Neurologist Oliver Sacks on Memory, Plagiarism, and the Necessary Forgettings of Creativity (brainpickings)
  • On the relationship between mindfulness and exercise. (well.blogs.nytimes)
  • What is the secret of Minneapolis? (theatlantic)
  • Our Amazingly Plastic Brains: Mental and physical exercise can keep the brain fit and help it recover capacities lost to disease and trauma&nbsp (wsj)
  • When you have a lot of solar you need a lot of batteries. (theverge)

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