05/10/15 – Weekend Interest-ing Reads

  • Are Facebook’s ($FB) algorithms creating a ‘filter bubble’ for users? (fastcompany)
  • How Amazon Became the Moneyball Network: Amazon has turned last-dibs status into a competitive advantage (vulture)
  • Why stock market contests teach dangerous lessons to beginning investors. (blogs.wsj)
  • Beards are generally not “filthy and dangerous.” (slate)
  • Ranking chili peppers by the burn. (fivethirtyeight)
  • I Don’t Want to Be a Role Model: Angelien Kemna, the reluctant face of an industry. (ai-cio)
  • The Judge Who Coined “Indict a Ham Sandwich” Was Himself Indicted (slate)
  • How self-driving cars could transform cities. (readwrite)
  • There is a difference between nature and “Nature Inc.” (gawker)
  • Doctors are trying to fix worn out knees with new meniscus. (wsj)
  • A primal connection exists between our brain and our gut. An excerpt from “The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood and Your Long-Term Health” by Justin Sonnenburg and Erica Sonnenburg.* (scientificamerican)
  • An ETF roundtable focused on international funds. (online.barrons)
  • How to use Fidelity’s sector analysts to get a leg up. (stockcharts)
  • A New Yorker visits San Francisco. (thereformedbroker)
  • Miller Coors ($TAP) is getting sued for calling Blue Moon a “craft beer.” (qz)
  • Just how broke are NFL players post-retirement? (fivethirtyeight)
  • A dozen things learned from Julian Robertson about investing. (25iq)
  • Business schools are fighting over top female applicants. (wsj)
  • Mass Incarceration: The Silence of the Judges. What caused the crime decline? (nybooks)
  • Six ways Vanguard has changed the way we invest. (marketwatch)
  • When do complex portfolios win? (basonasset)
  • What temperature constitutes a fever? (well.blogs.nytimes)
  • This economic recovery can’t get any respect. (pragcap)
  • On the decline of pseudoscience. (newrepublic)
  • Personalized Medicine: Time for One-Person Trials (nature)
  • Orchestras are cashing in on live movie concerts. (variety)
  • Moving to Mars: Preparing for the longest, loneliest voyage ever (newyorker)
  • How Apple’s ($AAPL) ResearchKit could aid in DNA research. (technologyreview)
  • Aging Deadheads are coming out of retirement. (wsj)
  • The King of the Pizza Nerds Is Opening His Own Restaurant (bloomberg)
  • On the challenges of designing for the Apple ($AAPL) Watch. (marco)
  • Eat more plants to save the planet from global warming. (scientificamerican)
  • Here’s what CEOs were saying about the economy this week. (skrisiloff.tumblr)
  • Slot Machines Perfected Addictive Gaming. Now, Tech Wants Their Tricks (theverge)
  • Do you we really need a smart [fill in the blank]? (wsj)
  • The economic schedule for the coming week. (calculatedriskblog)
  • Spotify is girding for an Apple ($AAPL) Beats onslaught. (time)
  • Investors can thank themselves for lower mutual fund fees. (nytimes)
  • Why HBO gets respect. (lefsetz)
  • Why we can’t get away from “the bundle.” (newyorker)
  • Third Avenue shows the difficulty of transitioning from a strong founder. (online.barrons)
  • The downside of concierge medicine. (slate)
  • Why autonomous trucks will make the roads safer. (slate)
  • What Hollywood Can Teach Us About the Future of Work (nytimes)
  • Still no rebound in the labor participation rate. (humblestudentofthemarkets.blogspot)
  • Diets don’t work but these two strategies do. (washingtonpost)
  • Some unsolicited advice for recent college graduations. (fool)
  • Maple syrup could be used to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (thedailybeast)
  • It’s always a good idea to feed Wall Street when pitching them your IPO. (blogs.wsj)
  • The Onion Is Not a Joke: How a fake newspaper is turning into a real media empire (theatlantic)
  • Why 1991 was an important year for music. (theatlantic)
  • Apple ($AAPL) succeeds by being customer-focused. (daringfireball)
  • Hedge funds need to take their own cyber security more seriously. (ft)
  • Some Practical Thoughts on Suicide (fourhourworkweek)
  • Americans are drinking less but paying more. (bloomberg)

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