10/29/17 – Sunday’s Interest-ing Reads

  • Will Stronger Borders Weaken Innovation? (strategy-business)
  • The restaurant industry is having its own Harvey Weinstein moment. (newyorker)
  • Two longer interviews in the most recent Graham and Doddsville newsletter with Howard Marks and Paul Sonkin and Paul Johnson authors of "Pitch the Perfect Investment." (www8.gsb.columbia.edu)
  • How Angela Ahrendts is pushing Apple’s ($AAPL) stores into their next decade. (buzzfeed)
  • The Sonos PLAY:1 speaker is the best implementation of Alexa. (wsj)
  • When we stress our brains and bodies simultaneously the brain wins out. (nytimes)
  • Hackers are targeting US schools. (wsj)
  • The benefits to finishing college are not just financial/economic. (papers.ssrn)
  • Tesla ($TSLA) is having significant challenges with the Model 3. (mondaynote)
  • Seven ways to reduce anxiety in the moment. (wsj)
  • How to calm your FOMO. (howardlindzon)
  • Accelerating intelligence makes becoming great even more difficult. (medium)
  • Making the case for St Ignatius as a "management hero." (ft)
  • Beef prices are on the rise for the first time in a long time. (bloomberg)
  • Vanguard is not immune from shareholder pressure to divest from genocide-associated companies. (barrons)
  • The rise of the urban creative class hasn’t come without some dislocations (bloomberg)
  • Going inside the NFL’s meetings that decided how to handle anthem-kneeling (espn)
  • We attribute too much power to Facebook ($FB) engineers and not enough to users. (ben-evans)
  • What CEOs had to say about the economy this week. (avondaleam)
  • Why you should have surgery in the afternoon. (statnews)
  • Jamie Dimon may not know Bitcoin but he does know how to trade JP Morgan ($JPM) stock. (blogs.wsj)
  • What nomadic Mongolians can teach us about the future of technology. (wired)
  • The economic schedule for the coming week. (calculatedriskblog)
  • Is ‘private browsing’ really private? (spreadprivacy)
  • Friday was revenge of the megacap tech stocks. (wsj)
  • More acidic oceans are harming all manner of sea life. (bbc)
  • Consumer discretionary stocks are outperforming consumer staples. (jlfmi.tumblr)
  • Treasury yields are low but not out of bounds with history. (researchaffiliates)
  • When modelling successful people isn’t enough. (adamhgrimes)
  • So-called processed foods gets a bad rap. (thecut)
  • Is technology going to ruin the romance of sports? (wsj)
  • The Chevy Bolt is the "first practical, mass-market electric vehicle." (marketwatch)
  • Access to information is not the same thing as meaning. (rpseawright.wordpress)
  • Is mindfulness meditation good for kids? (vox)
  • What will the El Bulli Foundation actually do? (eater)
  • A visualization of the world’s debt. (visualcapitalist)
  • Nobody admits to joining a ‘cult’ but we do it anyway. (rpseawright.wordpress)
  • A look at how big Apple ($AAPL) Capital has gotten. (economist)
  • Nissan is joining Formula E. (theverge)
  • On the science of backpacks. (outsideonline)
  • Coca-Cola ($KO) knows it has a sugar problem. (buzzfeed)
  • Football concussion lawsuits are moving down the age scale. (melmagazine)
  • Seth Godin, "Yes, you’re an imposter. So am I and so is everyone else. Superman still lives on Krypton and the rest of us are just doing our best." (sethgodin.typepad)
  • Team trading is not a one-way street. (traderfeed.blogspot.ca)
  • Sonos is taking all the right steps to make its speakers bot-friendly. (businessinsider)
  • As long as the web grow, so grows Google ($GOOGL) (theatlantic)
  • On the psychological power of a soothing touch. (cbc.ca)
  • How Amy Cuddy got caught up in the wave of social science replication challenges. (nytimes)
  • A dozen lessons from Megan Quinn about a "Growth Mindset." (25iq)
  • How climate change is affecting olive trees. (nytimes)
  • Apple’s ($AAPL) approach to original video content is pretty conservative. (bloomberg)
  • Cashing in on the donated dead: In the U.S. market for human bodies, anyone can sell the donated dead (reuters)
  • Interest in the Beatles’ music is fading. (digitalmusicnews)
  • How hurrican-vulnerable Cape Coral, Florida became one of the fastest growing cities in America. (politico)
  • When This Land Is No Longer Your Land (bloomberg)
  • Why we humans are superstitious. (review.chicagobooth.edu)
  • There are now 120 hedge funds focused on cryptocurrencies. (cnbc)
  • University endowment funds are increasingly adopting ESG investment strategies. (ai-cio)
  • Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens (wired.co.uk)
  • Be very wary of the celebrity-endorsed ICO. (mobile.nytimes)
  • Gene therapy is coming: the upsides and downsides are many. (ft)
  • How MDMA became a potential breakthrough therapy for PTSD. (wsj)
  • There’s only so much the big brewers can do to further lower costs. (bloomberg)
  • A startup wants to make getting beta blockers easier. (statnews)
  • Online dating algorithms are only getting better and probably know you better than yourselves. (gizmodo)
  • People are increasingly asking Alexa questions about ‘loneliness, depression and suicide.’ (wsj)
  • Can science make alcohol more liver-friendly? (wsj)
  • How to use data to help consumers not sell them more stuff. (iheartwallstreet)
  • Some people take playing cornhole very seriously. (tedium.co)
  • Why teenagers need more sleep. (ft)
  • We still don’t really understand sleep. (digg)
  • Aswath Damodaran, "To me, Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and ICOs are different enough from each other, not only in structure but also in terms of end game, that they need to be assessed independently." (aswathdamodaran.blogspot)
  • The Univ. of Wisconsin is thinking of ending its MBA program. (wsj)
  • A succinct summary of the week’s economic events. (ritholtz)
  • Now bartenders are getting disrupted by technology. (esquire)
  • Nathan Kontny, "Not everything we do needs a Go Big or Go Home mindset. There are ways to incorporate the smaller ideas." (m.signalvnoise)
  • The smart home is happening but it won’t create a passel of new, successful companies. (ft)
  • How the center position has changed in the NBA. (wsj)
  • What would ‘mathematically fair’ election maps look like? (fastcompany)
  • The airport check-in process hasn’t really changed all that much. (bloomberg)
  • How small and mid-sizes businesses should think about the 800-pound gorilla that is Amazon ($AMZN). (adventur.es)
  • Snap ($SNAP) has a cash flow issue. (theinformation)
  • Rotten Tomatoes is coming to Facebook ($FB). (qz)
  • Two lessons from the man who called the 1929 stock market crash. (blogs.wsj)
  • Some economic effects in the US from climate change. (ritholtz)
  • A profile of the Sackler family owners of Purdue Pharma, key players in the opioid epidemic. (newyorker)
  • Instant gratification reduces the amount of gratification. (heleo)
  • Aaron E. Carroll, "We want to believe there are easy fixes to the obesity epidemic and nutrition in general…When nutrition solutions sound too good to be true, there’s a good chance they are." (nytimes)
  • The decline in US fertility rates are duly primarily to falling teen birth rates. (wsj)
  • Dairy cows are increasingly connected. (ft)
  • Morra Aarons-Mele, "Pack your company culture with mandated office time, happy hours, and off-site meetings, and you risk alienating introverts." (work.qz)
  • Are MBA admissions consultants worth the money? (ft)
  • The case for fasting to help lose weight. (blog.supplysideliberal)
  • Men just can’t help themselves from mansplaining, even to other men. (melmagazine)
  • The pain of nostalgia is real. (qz)
  • We waste a sh*t ton of food. (wired)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *