11/23/15 – Monday’s Interest-ing Reads

  • Female meteorologists around the country are obsessed with the same exact dress (Tech Insider)
  • The iPad Pro Can’t Replace Your Laptop Totally, Even for a Tablet Lover (recode)
  • It takes an army to advise on a huge pharma inversion deal. (ftalphaville.ft)
  • What investors need to consider when building a momentum strategy. (blog.alphaarchitect)
  • How does the stock market do during Thanksgiving Week. (quantifiableedges)
  • Masters of the Finance Universe Are Worried About China (bloomberg)
  • What typically happens to stocks after the Fed starts raising rates. (seeitmarket)
  • The 10 best apps for the iPad Pro. (time)
  • Copper prices have been going down for years. (shortsideoflong)
  • Hedge funds are stealing computer scientists from Silicon Valley. (ft)
  • Are stock buybacks good or evil? (wsj)
  • Raising your media IQ. My Q&A with Brett Steenbarger. (forbes)
  • These are the most crowded trades among the 50 largest hedge funds (FactSet)
  • Morgan Stanley (wisely) doesn’t mess much with its broker comp plans for 2016, still pushing lending (Wall Street Journal)
  • The ECB is nearing the beginning of the end of QE. (blogs.ft)
  • Wow – Pfizer and Allergan agree to historic $150 billion merger (Wall Street Journal)
  • Anatomy of a NIMBY: Grief over growth is perennial, but it hasn’t always been this bad. How a detente over development failed and fueled the rise of the modern neighborhood preservationist. (seattleweekly)
  • Correlations between the dollar and commodities are not as strong as you think (Indexology)
  • Value has underperformed. Time to overweight it. (researchaffiliates)
  • Revenue growth: it’s what will drive returns going forward. (blog.abglobal)
  • Emerging market P/E ratios are all over the place. (bloomberg)
  • Rising interest rates need not be a disaster for a diversified portfolio. (blog.alphaarchitect)
  • How ordinary people decide to become terrorists (vox)
  • Momentum has a lot of data backing its efficacy. (businessinsider)
  • There’s now a fossil-free ETF. (fastcoexist)
  • Does Apple Still Deserve Its Reputation for Brilliant Design? (slate)
  • Brussels on lockdown all weekend, authorities arresting people connected with terror overnight (BBC)
  • The Chicago Fed National Activity Index was up in October. (calculatedriskblog)
  • The iPad Pro is good but it won’t replace your laptop. (sixcolors)
  • Do US return factors hold up in Europe? (etf)
  • Even Apple ($AAPL) isn’t above a little subscription skulduggery. (blog.supplysideliberal)
  • BLS on State Unemployment Rates: No State at or above 7%, First Time since early 2007 (calculatedriskblog)
  • Overreaction is why value works. (blog.alphaarchitect)
  • Can You Pick the Guys Who Pick the Guys Who Pick the Best Stocks? (blogs.wsj)
  • Did the Fed already make its big policy error by not hiking sooner? (Bloomberg)
  • Yet another active management takedown. (etf)
  • Does trend following and momentum work in global REITs? (blog.alphaarchitect)
  • The Asteroid Hunters: It’s highly unlikely that a gigantic space rock will crash through our atmosphere and destroy civilization as we know it. But it’s not impossible either. (popularmechanics)
  • The Big Issues Of The 2016 Campaign (fivethirtyeight)
  • Public pensions are owning up to a painful truth about their private-equity bets: They never totaled the bill (Wall Street Journal)
  • Meet the treasure seekers who hunt millions in undersea gold (marketwatch)
  • Testing momentum in the stock market of Imperial Russia. (papers.ssrn)
  • What is going on with global oil production. (econbrowser)
  • Pfizer ($PFE) and Allergan ($AGN) are a thing. Expect pushback. (bloomberg)
  • Don’t gift the Apple ($AAPL) Watch THIS year. (fastcodesign)
  • Why the tech IPO went out of vogue. (bclund)
  • Emerging market equities played catch up last week. (capitalspectator)
  • The financial crisis is still fresh in the minds of many investors. (awealthofcommonsense)
  • The Fed is set to raise rates but can it break the trend of other central banks who failed at raising rates. (economistsview.typepad)

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