12/01/15 – Tuesday’s Interest-ing Reads

  • When should you consider investing in a “re-seed round.” (pointsandfigures)
  • How Apple ($AAPL) could compete in the car business. (mondaynote)
  • IT’S HAPPENING: We’re seeing the first real-world effects of negative interest rates in Europe (Business Insider)
  • Startup funding in India is booming. (latimes)
  • China Joins World’s Elite Currency Club (Wall Street Journal )
  • How changes in valuations affect booms and busts in startupland. (continuations)
  • On the (welcome) decline of the office holiday party. (bloomberg)
  • The Case for Further Policy Stimulus in the Euro Area (blogs.piie)
  • Business investment is “fizzling out.” (wsj)
  • Short Answers to Hard Questions About Climate Change (nytimes)
  • The Last 90 VC-Backed Tech IPOs Have Dramatically Underperformed the Market (all in one chart) (climateerinvest.blogspot)
  • Hacking a Hedge Fund: There are worse things than a market crash. (ai-cio)
  • The November manufacturing ISM showed contraction. (crossingwallstreet)
  • Apple ($AAPL) still wants to get into the payment biz. (bloomberg)
  • A tough year even for hedge fund wunderkinds (Bloomberg)
  • Three reasons why students funnel into banking. (news.efinancialcareers)
  • The trade-off between hiring for fit and hiring for potential. (hunterwalk)
  • Five reasons not to raise venture capital money. (capitalistexploits.at)
  • New Fed Rule Limits Emergency Lending Power (nytimes)
  • IPOs in Hong Kong don’t typically experience “pops.” (ft)
  • Scientists are looking at these indicators to measure climate change (washingtonpost)
  • Alternative asset funds show a “behavior gap.” (news.morningstar)
  • The dollar resumes its uptrend (Dragonfly Capital)
  • Paul Krugman on Robert Reich’s new book, Saving Capitalism (NY Review of Books)
  • Another big hedge fund manager is returning outside capital. (bloomberg)
  • Do fewer things better. (onstartups)
  • The Fed may raise rates over the next year in “fits and starts.” (economistsview.typepad)
  • Fidelity: We were just kidding about marking down our VC investments (this is fishy…) (Fortune)
  • Stock valuations look “reasonable” at current levels. (scottgrannis.blogspot)
  • China’s Renminbi is now an official “reserve currency.” (nytimes)
  • China’s Renminbi Is Approved by I.M.F. as a Main World Currency (New York Times)
  • Why Wall Street’s campaign to enrich shareholders could be bad for everyone else (vox)
  • Don’t fall out of your chair, but JPMorgan has another corruption scandal on its hands (Wall Street Journal)
  • Morgan Stanley ($MS) is cutting trading jobs. (wsj)
  • Are the Saudis “overproducing” oil? (valueplays)
  • Vanguard is saving investors billions of dollar a year in fees. (bloomberg)
  • The Apple ($AAPL) Watch feels like a “stalled platform.” (qz)
  • There really is no defense of closet indexing. (pragcap)
  • Canada’s economy grew in Q3. (business.financialpost)
  • A look at November asset class performance. (capitalspectator)
  • Getting In Cognitive Shape: The Power Of Brain Fitness (forbes)
  • Karl Rove Opens His Rolodex for Ben Carson (bloomberg)
  • Will Congress Finally Declare War on ISIS? (The Atlantic)
  • Why some entrepreneurs go back to corporate life. (ft)
  • What your smartphone usage says about your creditworthiness. (wsj)
  • Chinese Cash Floods U.S. Real Estate Market (nytimes)
  • Impact Investing is becoming a mainstream thing (Bloomberg)
  • How search engines make us feel smarter than we really are (boingboing)
  • Chinese Pull Back From U.S. Property Investments (wsj)
  • In defense of closet indexing. (news.morningstar)
  • Winners determine how a VC fund performs, not how much you can salvage from the losers. (avc)
  • Americans are still dining out at restaurants at a good clip. (calculatedriskblog)
  • An Ode To Kobe Bryant, In Two Charts (fivethirtyeight)
  • Bill Gurley is still skeptical about the sustainability of this Silicon Valley boom. (technologyreview)
  • Ted Cruz Surges in Iowa, Powered by Outsider Fervor (nytimes)
  • Apple ($AAPL) spends a lot less on R&D (as a percentage of sales) than other big tech companies. (bloomberg)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *